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Written by September 19 2018 0

The Sociedad Antioqueña de Ornitologia (SAO, the Medellin ornithological society) announced September 19 that the fifth annual “Festival de las Aves de Medellin” will take flight October 3 to October 8.

All local Festival programs -- including lectures by national and international experts, special learning workshops and guided, local bird walks -- are free. But the post-festival birding trips to Manantiales or Napoles, Antioquia -- which require special advance registrations -- carry separate charges.

Complete Festival program details -- including instructions on how to sign-up for the workshops and the local bird walks -- are available here: https://www.festivaldelasavesmedellin.com.

Registrations for the post-festival birding trips (Manantiales or Napoles)-- departing October 6 and returning October 8 -- can be made here: https://www.festivaldelasavesmedellin.com/pajareadaspostfestival .  However, as of this writing, the Napoles birding trip was already fully booked.

The option for joining the (still-available at this writing) Manantiales birding trip is nothing short of spectacular (see: http://www.medellinherald.com/ecot/item/239-paradise-restored-manantiales-nature-reserve-symbolizes-colombia’s-hopeful-future, titled "Paradise Restored: Manantiales Nature Reserve Symbolizes Colombia’s Hopeful Future," Medellin Herald, January 04, 2016).

According to the SAO, the annual Medellin Bird Festivals “seek to position Medellin as the 'Bird Capital of the World,' as recognized nationally and internationally, and also so that local citizens learn to appreciate their natural heritage.

“It’s clear that people only love and appreciate what they know -- which is why it is vital to integrate scientific [bird] knowledge with educational-cultural events in our city spaces. Thus, this Festival seeks to offer the public a place for recreation and learning which generates knowledge, ownership and awareness of the great diversity of birds that are hosted in this territory.”

Lecture, workshop and birding highlights this year include:

8 am-12 noon Wednesday, October 3: Workshop for children on how to use the “Merlin” bird-identification cell-phone application, at EAFIT university in Medellin (Las Vegas campus).

2 pm Wednesday, October 3: Workshop on how to prevent collisions of birds against buildings and other structures, at Corantioquia headwaters in Medellin.

2-3 pm Wednesday, October 3: Workshop for adults on how to use the “Merlin” bird-identification cell-phone application, EAFIT university (Las Vegas).

3-4 pm Wednesday, October 4: Official debut of new illustrated book, “Birds of Ituango,” by EPM and University of Antioquia, and a bird-photography exhibition, both at EAFIT university (Las Vegas).

5:30 am to 11 am Thursday, October 5: Choice of bird walks either to Parque Arvi, Parque Presidenta, or San Sebastian de la Castellana.

2 pm Thursday, October 5: Lecture on Medellin’s new “green corridors” (Planetarium auditorium, next to Parque Explora).

2:50 pm Thursday, October 5: Lecture featuring professors and children from Restrepo, Meta department, on their novel “Alas de Saber” ornithology-teaching curriculum for children, at Planetarium.

3:45 pm Thursday, October 5: Expert lecture on how to prevent bird collisions with power lines in Colombia, at Planetarium.

6 pm Thursday, October 5: “Science on Bicycles” event featuring hummingbird observations. Departs from Planetarium.

5:30 a.m.-11 am Friday, October 6: Optional bird-walks to Parque Arvi, Parque Presidenta, San Sebastian de la Castellana, EAFIT Llanogrande or EAFIT Medellin (Las Vegas campus).

2 pm Friday, October 6: Lecture on the birds of the Alto de San Miguel nature reserve (Caldas, Antioquia), EAFIT university (Las Vegas campus).

4 pm Friday, October 6: Lecture on the “Merlin” birding application by Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology (USA) bird expert Drew Weber, EAFIT university (Las Vegas campus).

6 pm Friday, October 6: Lecture on urban birds by Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology bird expert Karen Purcell, EAFIT university (Las Vegas campus).

Written by August 28 2018 0
Colombia’s Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism (MinCIT) announced August 28 that Antioquian milk-products producers Colanta and Proleche are among 11 companies that just won certifications and approvals to export certain dairy-based products to Mexico.
 
MinCIT, ProColombia and Invima collectively worked to open Mexico’s doors to Colombian milk products from 13 newly licensed processing plants in nine Colombian departments, according to the Ministry.
 
“The products that can be sold [to Mexico] vary depending on the establishment,” according to MinCIT.
 
On the newly approved list are mozzarella cheese, white cheese, whole and skimmed milk powder, whey powder, buffalo whey, whole and buffalo flavored yogurt, buffalo arequipe, industrial milk powder, canned condensed milk, canned cream, arequipe, dulce de leche, chocolate milk, strawberry and vanilla flavored milk, whole milk-based drink with oatmeal, and almond-flavored milk.
 
“This is excellent news for the dairymen of Colombia and, in addition, it is a sign of the great benefits that will bring for the national producers from a foreign trade policy focused upon taking advantage of the commercial agreements that we have in force,” added MinCIT Minister José Manuel Restrepo Abondano.
 
Prior to the Mexico deal, Colombian regulatory authorities had identified and then controlled an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in some ranching areas of the country. That control work eventually convinced Mexican authorities that Colombia is a reliable trade partner, ensuring sanitary practices.
 
“The work of health diplomacy is key, which in this case was anticipated -- and that should be the norm for us to continue opening the doors of the markets to our products,” Minister Restrepo added.
 
According to Invima, certified Colombian dairy plants now have access to 18 export markets including Bangladesh, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, the United States, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Morocco, Mexico, Panama, Peru, and the Eurasian Economic Union (Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Armenia).
Written by August 25 2018 0
Wall Street bond rater Fitch announced September 12 that it has decided to maintain its "AAA (col)" investment-grade rating for Medellin-based multinational electric power giant EPM -- but issued a cautionary “negative” outlook.
 
The Fitch decision follows in the wake of fellow Wall Street bond rater Moody's, which last month likewise maintained an investment-grade rating on EPM -- but issued a similar cautionary outlook because of an EPM-estimated COP$7 trillion (US$2.27 billion) financial shortfall resulting from infrastructure damage and power-sales delays from the 2.4-gigawatt "Hidroituango" hydroelectric plant in Antioquia.
 
Commenting on the action, EPM general manager Jorge Londoño de la Cuesta added that “the rating of Fitch Ratings is in addition to that recently obtained by Moody's Investors Service that ratified the international rating of EPM at 'Baa3,' an investment-grade level, and assigned a 'negative' outlook, as a demonstration of our company's efforts to overcome the contingency in the Hidroituango hydroelectric project and continue to advance in our mission to contribute to the well-being of millions of people in the regions where we have a presence."
 
The Moody’s rating reflects EPM’s “revenue diversification geographically and, of among businesses, a significant contribution to EBITDA [earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization] by our energy distribution businesses, the condition of relative control of the contingency of the Hidroituango hydroelectric project and the asset-sale plan announced by the company,” according to EPM.
 
“Moody’s rating also incorporates EPM’s rapid response to the required adjustments in terms of its commercial policy, ensuring the supply of natural gas to dispatch [electric power from] its La Sierra combined-cycle natural gas thermal power station, with an installed capacity of 450-megawatts, as well as the purchase of energy through medium-term contracts to meet the energy obligations contracted for 2020 and 2021.
 
“With this rating granted by Moody’s, EPM maintains -- along with the current BBB (-) rating of Fitch Ratings -- a double investment grade, a category considered in the financial market that provides an adequate credit quality and certainty of repayment to the most demanding investors in risk profiles,” EPM added.
Written by August 23 2018 0
Medellin-based multinational electric-power grid operator ISA reported August 13 that its second quarter (2Q) 2018 net income dropped 16% year-on-year, to COP$232 billion (US$77.6 million).
 
Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) for 2Q 2018 likewise dropped 3.8% year-on-year, to COP$945 billion (US$316 million), according to the company.
 
As for first-half (1H) 2018 results, net income is up 2.3% year-on-year, to COP$530 billion (US$177 million), while 1H 2018 EBITDA rose 4% year-on-year, to COP$2 trillion (US$669 million).
 
“In the second quarter of 2018, there were no extraordinary events. However, for comparative purposes, it should be taken into account that in second quarter 2017, the [upward] adjustment of the value of the RBSE [power transmission network] in Brazil was included,” according to ISA.
 
“This factor generated net operating income of COP$359 billion [US$120 million], a deferred income tax of COP$122 billion [US$41 million] and net income of COP$85 billion [US$28 million). Because this was a non-recurring event, we will exclude it in the [current] analysis.”
 
The 1H 2018 profit results “include the recovery of taxes in Colombia and Brazil, the entry into operation of new energy transmission and roads projects in Peru, Colombia and Chile and the incorporation of the results of [recently added transmission networks] TAESA and IENNE,” according to ISA.
 
As for 2018 plans, ISA plans to invest COP$3.5 trillion (US$1.17 billion), “one of the highest in recent years,” with 92% of that in its electric energy transmission businesses, followed by 4.5% in its highway concessions and the remainder in information technology, telecom and systems management, according to the company.
Written by August 23 2018 0

August is the month when both Medellin and Detroit celebrate classic cars -- and the joyful return of positive vibes -- via the “Desfile de Autos Clasicos” here and the gigantic “Woodward Dream Cruise” in Detroit.

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NEW GUIDE "Avifauna de Colombia" (link by clicking on book)

SILLETEROS PARADE 2016 by JOHN AND DONNA STORMZAND (click to enlarge)

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About Medellin Herald

Medellin Herald is a locally produced, English-language news and advisory service uniquely focused upon a more-mature audience of visitors, investors, conference and trade-show attendees, property buyers, expats, retirees, volunteers and nature lovers.

U.S. native Roberto Peckham, who founded Medellin Herald in 2015, has been residing in metro Medellin since 2005 and has traveled regularly and extensively throughout Colombia since 1981.

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